HSA Blog

“Creating ‘Black and Blue,'” by Ken Fandell

Art by Ken Fandell, Black and Blue

In addition to my role as professor of art and the Michael G. and C. Jane Wilson Chair in the Arts and Humanities, I’m an artist who makes photographs, videos, collages, sculptures, sounds, drawings, performances and text-based works. I often start with straightforward objects as subject matter. My approach mines the mundane and the everyday […]

“Changemakers Share Insights with Students,” By Paul Steinberg

How does social impact work? Many people doubt that social change is even possible, but those on the front lines of efforts to make the world a better place know otherwise. In spring 2021, students in my Global Environmental Politics course at Harvey Mudd interviewed renowned changemakers from their hometowns—activists, elected officials, entrepreneurs and others—with […]

“Caliphate is ISIS Fan-Fic,” by Ambereen Dadabhoy

Image credit NYT and Caliphate podcast

As a rule, I don’t pay much attention to explicitly Orientalist media. I get enough of it implicitly, through the back-door, as it were, by virtue of being a living, breathing citizen of the United States of America. Our mainstream, political, and popular culture is full of exoticized, eroticized, dangerous, and damaging portrayals of the […]

“Why Do People Justify Oppressive Systems?” by Anup Gampa

Woman holding head in hands on train

Wealth inequality in the U.S. is at unprecedented levels, and yet we don’t see the kind of resistance to it that one might expect, especially from the ones who are most hurt by it. Every field of social science has its fair share of theories to help understand resistance to oppressive systems, and so does […]

Socially Distanced Performance of Beethoven’s 9th Symphony, Claremont Concert Orchestra

In the remote setting of COVID, orchestra director David Cubek—who holds a joint faculty appointment in Harvey Mudd’s Department of Humanities, Social Sciences, and the Arts and at Scripps College—continues to engage students in a rich experience with the arts. The Claremont Concert Orchestra is one of three student ensembles in the Joint Music Program […]

“Women Bike Less, But Do They Voice More?” by Paul Steinberg

Black and white photo of a woman bicycling on a city street

Bicycles have been in the news a lot lately as people look for recreation options during the COVID lockdown. Cycling has also received growing attention as a climate-friendly transportation option. In the United States, passenger vehicle trips are the main contributor to greenhouse gas emissions in the transportation sector. Over a third of these trips […]

“Learning With Machines,” by Ekaterina Babinsteva

A photo of nursing students learning with PLATO III at Mercy Hospital, Chicago, IL. Courtesy of the University of Illinois Archive, Collection “

As a historian of psychology and computing, I am interested in two questions: How did the developments in cybernetics and artificial intelligence (AI) prompt new approaches to understanding the human mind and its creative abilities? And, how did the ideas about minds and computers travel across political, economic and ideological contexts in the twentieth century? […]