Assessment Examples and Resources

There are many approaches to assessment, and approaches developed for one program can be readily adapted for use in other departments or situations. Below are some ideas and practical examples from assessment projects at Harvey Mudd College and from higher education organizations.

Practical Examples of Assessment at Harvey Mudd College

Examples from Harvey Mudd departments and programs

Rubrics, test and exam questions, survey and interview questionnaires and other approaches developed or adapted by Harvey Mudd faculty and staff.

Assessment Resources from Professional Associations

AAC&U VALUE Rubrics

These are rubrics developed by national teams of faculty led by the Association of American Colleges and universities for assessing outcomes that are common across institutions and programs (e.g. critical thinking, oral communication)

AAC&U Assessment website

Helpful publications and examples of assessment practices from a variety of institutions.

National Institute for Learning Outcomes Assessment

Reports, occasional papers, and examples of practice from an organization working to make learning outcomes useable and transparent to professionals and stakeholders in higher education

NASPA Student Affairs Assessment, Evaluation and Research Knowledge Community

Helpful publications and institutional examples for assessing student learning and development in student affairs divisions

ACPA Commission for Assessment and Evaluation

Resources from the American College Personnel Association to promote assessment skills and knowledge to student learning, development and effective student affairs practice.

Articles, Books and Resources on the Topic of Assessment

Articles

Adelman, C. (2015, February). To Imagine a Verb: The Language and Syntax of Learning Outcomes Statements (Occasional Paper No. 24). Urbana, IL: University of Illinois and Indiana University, National Institute for Learning Outcomes Assessment.
Barr, R. B., and Tagg, J. (1995). From teaching to learning: A new paradigm for education Change, 27 (6).

Blaich, C. F., & Wise, K. S. (2011, January). From gathering to using assessment results: Lessons from the Wabash National Study (NILOA Occasional Paper No.8). Urbana, IL: University of Illinois and Indiana University, National Institute for Learning Outcomes Assessment.

Braskamp, L.A, & Engberg, M.E. (2014). Guidelines for judging the effectiveness of assessing student learning. Loyola University Chicago: Chicago, IL.

Eubanks, D., & Gliem, D. (2015, May). Improving teaching, learning, and assessment by making evidence of achievement transparent. (Occasional Paper No. 25). Urbana, IL: University of Illinois and Indiana University, National Institute for Learning Outcomes Assessment.

Ewell, P. T. (2009, November). Assessment, accountability, and improvement: Revisiting the tension (NILOA Occasional Paper No.1). Urbana, IL: University of Illinois and Indiana University, National Institute for Learning Outcomes Assessment.

Hutchings, P., Ewell, P., and Banta, T. (2012) AAHE principles of good practice: Aging nicely.

Hutchings, P. (2016, January). Aligning Educational Outcomes and Practices (Occasional Paper No. 26). Urbana, IL: University of Illinois and Indiana University, National Institute for Learning Outcomes Assessment.

Hutchings, P. (2010, April). Opening doors to faculty involvement in assessment (NILOA Occasional Paper No.4). Urbana, IL: University of Illinois and Indiana University, National Institute for Learning Outcomes Assessment.

Ikenberry, S. (2015). Perspective: Three Things Presidents Need to Know about Student Learning Outcomes Assessment.

Lang, J. (2016, January 11). Small changes in teaching: The first 5 minutes of class, Chronicle of Higher Education.

Miller, M. A. (2012, January). From denial to acceptance: The stages of assessment (NILOA Occasional Paper No.13). Urbana, IL: University of Illinois and Indiana University, National Institute for Learning Outcomes Assessment.

National Institute for Learning Outcomes Assessment. (2016, May). Higher education quality: Why documenting learning matters (PDF). Urbana, IL: University of Illinois and Indiana University, Author.

Reed, M. (Nov. 19, Inside Higher Ed) Assessment and the Value of Big, Dumb Questions

Books

Banta, T.W, Jones, E.A., & Black K. E. (2009). Designing effective assessment: Principles and profiles of good practice. Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA

Driscoll, A. & Wood, S. (2007). Developing outcomes-based assessment for learner-centered education: A faculty introduction. Stylus, Sterling, VA.

Kuh, G. D., Ikenberry, S. O., Jankowski, N. A., Cain, T. R., Ewell. P. T., Hutchings, P.T., & Kinzie, J. (2015). Using evidence of student learning to improve higher education. Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA.

Garcia, M., Hudgins, C., Musil, C. M., Nettles, M. T., Sedlacek, W. E., & Smith, D. G. (2001). Assessing campus diversity initiatives: A guide for campus practitioners. Association of American Colleges and Universities, Washington, DC.

Gawande, A. (2007). Better: A surgeon’s notes on performance. Picador, NYC, NY.

Rick Reis. “Planning Effective Assessment.” Tomorrows Professor 1455. Stanford University. eNewsletter. 14 Jan. 2016.

Walvoord, B. E. (2010). Assessment clear and simple: A practical guide for institutions, department, and general education. Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA

Turner, J. & Shellard, E. (2004) Developing and Using Instructional Rubrics. Educational Research Service, Arlington, VA.

Blogs

Association of American Colleges and Universities: liberal.education nation (A blog from the LEAP Initiative)
“It features postings and perspectives on “liberal education” – how it is changing, why it is so important in today’s world, and what people are saying about it around the country and the world.”

David Eubanks: Dr. Eubanks, Associate Vice President for Institutional research and Effectiveness at Furman University, regularly posts issues of assessment on his blog.

Linda Suskie: An international leader in higher education assessment and accreditation, this blog shares her common sense approach to assessment.

Pat Williams: Assess this! is a gathering place for information and resources about new and better ways to promote learning in higher education, with a special focus on high-impact educational practices, student engagement, general or liberal education, and assessment of learning.

Listservs

Assess- Assessment in Higher Education from University of Kentucky is a go to place for dialogue about assessment. No login required to search past postings.

Evaluation Talk from the American Evaluation Association requires login information to join this conversation about evaluation and assessment.

POD: Professional and Organization Development Network in Higher Education is a listserv discussing teaching and learning issues as related to faculty development. No login required to read postings.

Student Affairs Assessment Leaders list’s main goal is to provide the opportunity for full-time student affairs assessment professionals to discuss issues to improve their work. The group and its listserv is open only to educators that coordinate assessment for divisions of student affairs.