Nelson Series Lecture: “Wild Labs for Wild Interactions,” Andrew Quitmeyer

November 21, 2019 Add to Calendar

7–8:30 p.m.

Location

Shanahan Center, Auditorium
320 E. Foothill Blvd.
Claremont, CA 91711

Contact

Office of Stewardship and Events
stewardship@hmc.edu
909.607.1818

Details

Co-Founder and Director, Digital Naturalism Laboratories
Television Host and Designer, Discovery Network’s Hacking the Wild

Quitmeyer is a hacker adventurer studying intersections between wild animals and computational devices. He left his job as a tenure track professor at the National University of Singapore to start his own field station makerspace, Digital Naturalism Laboratories (dinalab.net), in Gamboa, Panama. There, he blends biological fieldwork and DIY digital crafting with a community of scientists, artists, designers and engineers from around the world and runs mobile workshops called “Hiking Hacks” where participants build interactive technology in outdoor, natural contexts. The Digital Naturalism Conference (dinacon.org) is his largest annual event, during which 100 participants from all fields collaborate to find new ways of interacting with nature. Quitmeyer’s research also inspired a spin-off international television series for Discovery Networks called Hacking the Wild. He is the winner of several design awards, and his transdisciplinary, multimedia projects have been featured on the Discovery Channel, PBS, NPR and the Cartoon Network and in Wired, Make Magazine, Fast Company and Gizmodo, along with other print and digital internet news and educational sources. Quitmeyer earned dual bachelor’s degrees (industrial engineering and film production and theory) from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, and a master’s degree and PhD (digital media) from Georgia Institute of Technology.

Lecture: “Wild Labs for Wild Interactions”

Your tools shape how you understand and interact with the world, but they also take on characteristics of the environments in which they are developed. We will discuss the development of in-situ jungle laboratories for scientific and artistic tools and how technology developed in harsh environments differs from that developed in more traditional laboratories. In short, the technology you use is very much alive and evolving; we need to find ways for our tools to join us in exploring nature as peers instead of as conquerors.

Workshop

Join Quitmeyer for an outdoors Mobile Wet Lab workshop prior to the lecture from 1:15 to 4:15 p.m. Please email Rachel Mayeri, professor of media studies, at Join Quitmeyer for an outdoors Mobile Wet Lab workshop prior to the lecture from 1:15 to 4:15 p.m. Please email Rachel Mayeri, professor of media studies, at Join Quitmeyer for an outdoors Mobile Wet Lab workshop prior to the lecture from 1:15 to 4:15 p.m. Please email Rachel Mayeri, professor of media studies, at mayeri@g.hmc.edu if you are interested in attending.if you are interested in attending.

About the Nelson Series

Maker Cultures is about making and STEAM. The series is intended to inspire the Harvey Mudd community to create a culture for the new makerspace in the Scott A. McGregor Computer Science Center that is inclusive, creative, playful, sustainable and builds upon the College’s liberal arts environment. Maker Cultures invites the community to think beyond traditional makerspaces that make tools and materials available in a dedicated space, to maker cultures that are mobile, use living materials, re-make with recycled parts and cross disciplinary boundaries.